The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle - Book Review and Lessons - Fabio Bonanno

The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle – Book Review and Lessons

“Greatness Isn’t Born. It’s Grown. Here’s How”

When looking to succeed, it’s easy to say people have a talent and you are at a disadvantage.

In the book The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle, he goes into detail how this isn’t true.

What are the secrets to succeeding in life, sport or any endeavor you take on like music or work?

Deep practice, not talent

What makes people successful isn’t talent, it’s deep practice.

You may have heard of the outliers theory.

To be a master at anything you need to put in 10,000 hours of deep practice.

This means practicing with purpose.

Getting immediate feedback, stopping, changing and starting again, but this time better.

What happens in this process is you start to develop electrical circuits that send signals to the body from the brain.

In the book, Daniel talks about myelin.

The circuits you are developing are coated in the stuff.

It’s like insulation on an electrical cable.

The more myelin, the better that circuit fires.

Maybe a bit complex for you or I but that’s the basics of it.

So how do we get better if we don’t have talent?

The key is to get immediate feedback.

Struggle isn’t an option to grow and get better, it’s a requirement.

Many people look at failure as a bad thing but it is needed to get better.

When you fail at something, in work, in the gym, at home,

We find 1 way of not doing something.

If you get immediate feedback, change your approach and go again, but better,

You build a stronger myelin circuit and over time, you get better and better.

This then starts to look like talent.

You can do it.

Anyone can do it.

While myelin production is highest in kids (think about how quick they learn)

We don’t stop slowing down it’s production until 50.

Even then, you can still keep it going with practice.

Just like building muscle, you aren’t as good at 50 as you are at 20 but you can still do it with practice.

The 3 rules of deep practice

  • Try again
  • Fail again
  • Fail better

By chunking practice into blocks, you can systemise getting better at something.

  • Look at task as a whole
  • Chunk it up into smallest possible components 
  • Play with time. Slow it down then speed it up

What these steps mean are that you step back, think about everything.

You then break it down and learn the tasks in stages.

Start slow, master the slow part then get faster as you get better.

While it might seem logical, this system is what works according to the science.

Think about exercise.

When you try something new, you might be shaky.

Less control and bad balance.

After time, you get better then you can go faster without injury risk.

This is you building better myelin circuits.

Repeat it, talent comes later

The only way someone good becomes great is repetition.

Top athletes just practice more.

It has to be good practice so 12 hours per day isn’t necessarily better than 4 hours.

If the practice is good, there is immediate feedback with a change in the approach, you will get better, quicker.

That’s where skill looks like talent.

It’s just been repeated more.

It all starts early

If repetition and time are the key components to getting better then starting as young as possible is the key to develop true skill and mastery.

Tiger Woods, one of the best golfers of all time was swinging a club at the age of 18 months.

This just meant he had a head start.

He had the other factors in place too.

Feedback from a parent.

He seen his dad obsessed with golf.

Observation at a young age can ignite a fire to be better at something.

Like it or not, our kids use us as role models so our behaviour can determine their direction in life.

It doesn’t have to be perfect

The best athletes came from nothing.

Less than ideal situations.

These situations actually forced better practice.

By having less variables, they had to master the basics.

Small football pitches and many players forces better ball control.

Less space on a tennis court forces greater accuracy.

As long as there is feedback and changes in the right direction, skill increases.

Get a coach

Of course it’s difficult to do this all by yourself so having someone who has been there before with a professional perspective will help.

It speeds things up.

It takes your emotion away form the process.

That’s where top athlete coaches get paid the most.

The best PT’s will charge the most because they can spot the tiny mistakes in someones technique.

They have excellent motivational skills and can drive someone to be better.

The takeaway

You have been lied to all your life if you think talent is what you need to succeed.

While talent can be important, you are a minority.

Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.

Almost all of the best athletes have had to overcome big odds to succeed.

Starting young is great but not essential.

It’s never too late to change.

If you want to get better at something, business, exercise, playing music,

You have to practice intentionally.

This means you have to spot failures and mistakes early, stop, reset and come back to it, better.

Hiring a coach or a trainer speeds this process up.

It makes the failures better and you don’t have to repeat the process longer than required.

Belief is important

Knowing you can change is important because it helps you push through the failures.

If you believe you can change, you will keep working.

If you thought talent is what you needed to succeed, think again.

You’re in luck.

With a pit of effort, time and persistence, you can do anything.

Please share with a friend if this helped you, more people need to hear this message.

If you need help then with your health and fitness coaching, or working on your mindset to succeed then you can contact me here to arrange a free strategy call – https://fabiobonanno.coach/contact/

If you want to buy The Talent Code you can do so here – https://amzn.to/2Nz4dxf

About the Author fabiobonanno

Fabio is a health and wellness coach that changes business mens life without sacrificing the things they love.

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